Applewood Road bio

Applewood Road

In September 2014, three songwriters met for the first time in a cafe in East Nashville. By the next morning they had put the finishing touches to their first song, ‘Applewood Road’, which they recorded live to tape at Nashville’s all analogue studio, Welcome to 1979.

The song’s nostalgic air, along with the clear, sparse arrangement of three vocals accompanied by double bass, drew immediate positive response, and they decided to expand the idea into a full album.

Six months later, they reconvened to write, rehearse and record songs for the self-titled album Applewood Road. The songs were again performed live around a single microphone at Welcome to 1979 and recorded to two-track tape with minimal accompaniment from some of Nashville’s finest session players, including Aaron Lee Tasjan, Josh Day,  Fats Kaplin, Jabe Beyer, and Telisha Williams.

The tapes were assembled at London’s most exclusive high-end mastering suite, Gearbox Records, mastered through their vintage analogue outboard, and lacquers cut in-house on their own Haeco lathe.

Applewood Road is Emily Barker, Amber Rubarth and Amy Speace.

Artists’ website: http://applewoodroadmusic.com/

‘Losing My Religion’ live at Union Chapel:

APPLEWOOD ROAD – Applewood Road (Gearbox GB1531)

Applewood RoadThose for whom the highlight of the Oh Brother soundtrack was the coming together of Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Gillian Welch will undoubtedly have been disappointed that no further recordings by the trio followed. This album is for them. Meeting for the first time in the autumn of 2014, within two hours Emily Barker, Amber Rubarth and Amy Speace had written their first song. So pleased where they with the following week’s recordings, they decided to get back together and record some more. Six months later, with the help of guitarist Aaron Lee Tasjan, Telisha Williams on upright bass, drummer Josh Day, Jabe Beyer on harmonica and the great Fats Kaplin on accordion and fiddle, the album was completed, live to stereo tape.

Barker will, of course, be familiar from both her solo work and with Red Clay Halo, not to mention being responsible for the theme music to the BBC series Wallander and The Shadow Line, the latter of which won an Ivor Novello. A former actress, Peace, who was discovered by Judy Collins, has also released several critically acclaimed albums, among them How To Sleep In A Stormy Boat and That Kind of Girl, her song ‘Weight of the World’ being ranked fourth best Folk Song of the Decade by leading New York radio station WFUV.

Rubarth is probably a lesser known quantity, though she too has released a clutch of well reviewed albums as well as co-founding Brooklyn indie outfit The Paper Raincoat whose work has featured in, among others, One Tree Hill.

Here, they variously contribute collaborative and solo material, kicking off with the eponymous title track, the first and only song they wrote together, a dreamy, slow strummed close harmony leaving home number, the three voices backed just by upright bass. Next up is the first from Rubarth (whose name appears on seven of the 13 credits), co-writing with Norah Jones’ guitarist Adam Levy on ‘To The Stars’, a song that combines wishes, the magic of radio, love, life and mortality all in three minutes.

Elsewhere Rubarth joins writing forces with Adrianne Gonzalez and Garrison Starr on the guitar snare and claps gospel shuffle ‘Honey Won’t You’, and, Peace taking lead, Josh Day for the Van Gogh inspired ‘Row Boat’, the boat bobbing rhythm carried by a drum played in the manner of a tape loop.

Writing solo, she contributes ‘Old Time Country Song’, which, featuring fiddle, banjo and a false start to capture that live moment, sounds exactly as you would expect from the title; the Louvinsesque front porch good time ‘Lovin’ Eyes’ with Tasjan picking nylon string guitar; and the brief album closer lullaby ‘My Love Grows’.

Other than the title track, Peace is only credited on two numbers, her solo offering being ‘Josephine’, a mid-tempo, fiddle and guitar backed free spirit song to her niece written from the perspective of her twin brother. She also co-writes with Robby Hecht on the gentle first flames of romance that is ‘Give Me Love’ featuring Barker’s plucked banjo and Kaplin’s wheezing accordion. Hecht also pairs with Barker on ‘I’m Not Afraid Anymore’, Tasjan playing slide on a keening song about acknowledging when a relationship has run its course.

The album’s remaining three tracks are all penned by Barker, the first up being ‘Home Fires’ which, with minimally picked acoustic guitar and soaring three part harmonies, uses winter imagery to speak of how when you open your heart, you have to take in hurt as well as joy, but how you need to keep the fires burning to survive the cold. Built around a banjo riff and harmonica ‘Sad Little Tune’, an upbeat number about not taking things you already have for granted while wishing for more. And, finally, written, like that, in Western Australia and inspired by the bushfires burning while she was there, there’s the breezy cooing harmonies of the 30s flavoured ‘Bring The Car Round’, a similarly themed song about holding on to what matters. Unfussy and rather lovely, their voices flowing beautifully together this is a true delight and it’s to be hoped that this road is the start of a journey rather than the culmination of one.

Mike Davies

If you would like to order a copy of the album (in CD or Vinyl), download it or just listen to snippets of selected tracks (track previews are usually on the download page) then click on the banner link below to be taken to our associated partner Amazon’s website. Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

Artists’ website: http://applewoodroadmusic.com/

‘Lovin’ Eyes’ – official video:

Applewood Road – debut album

Applewood Road

In September 2014, three songwriters – Emily Barker, Amber Rubarth and Amy Speace – met for the first time in a cafe in East Nashville. Two hours later they had written the song they called ‘Applewood Road’. They booked studio time at Nashville’s super cool analogue studio Welcome To 1979 and the following week recorded the song live to tape with just double bass as accompaniment.

So excited were they by the song and the way that their voices blended together, they decided to expand the idea into a whole album. So, six months later, they reconvened in Nashville to write, rehearse and record twelve more songs with both the project and album called Applewood Road.

Back at Welcome To 1979, the songs were all recorded live to stereo tape with minimal accompaniment from some hugely talented session players – guitarist Aaron Lee Tasjan, Fats Kaplin on accordion, Telisha Williams on upright bass, Jabe Beyer on harmonica and drummer Josh Day. The completed album was then handed over to the expert hands of Gearbox Records in London to be mastered at their vintage analogue studio, complete with their own 1967 Heaco Scully lathe, Westrex amplifiers and Studer tape machines.

Applewood Road made their performance debut in Nashville during AmericanaFest 2015. A visit to the UK followed with live shows including Union Chapel in London, a showcase at Tileyard Studios and album playback at Gearbox Records, as well as a live radio session for Dermot O’Leary’s BBC Radio 2 show where they performed ‘Applewood Road’ and REM’s ‘Losing My Religion’.

The album Applewood Road will be released on 12th February 2016 as a 180gram vinyl album with free 24-bit 48kHz download. It will also be released as a compact disc and digital stream & download.

Emily, Amber and Amy will return to London for the launch of the album in early February and are available for interview. “Making our way down Applewood Road…….” Continue reading Applewood Road – debut album

Land Of Hope & Fury – what it’s all about

Land Of Hope & Fury

A message from Jamie & Stevie Freeman:

We woke up on May 8th to election results that left tens of millions of people feeling disenfranchised and without a voice. Rather than wait quietly for another five years before we got to have our say, we decided to return to the proud musical tradition of the protest song. Our votes might have counted for nothing, but we could still make our voices heard.

We contacted our many friends in the roots music world and asked them to contribute something to a compilation of contemporary protest songs, and the results were an incredibly diverse range of musical, emotional and political styles. Land Of Hope & Fury was born. Sixteen artists in total donated songs with nine of them written specifically for the album. This coming together of people, all acting out of simple desire to make the world a better place, has been the single most encouraging aspect of this project, It is the proof that Margaret Thatcher’s suggestion that “there’s no such thing as society” is as wrong today as ever it was.

38 Degrees

We didn’t want to profit financially from the album, so we looked for a suitable beneficiary that was aligned with our frustrations, but not bound to one set of policies. Politics had let us down, so a campaigning group from outside of the political system seemed like a good choice. We felt 38 Degrees’ mix of online petitioning and real-world actions was just right for Land Of Hope And Fury, and they were delighted to take part. We couldn’t be happier to have them alongside us.”

Jamie’s brother Martin Freeman (The Hobbit, The Office, Sherlock) made a video supporting the Labour Party, so his family are no stranger to politics.

Track List

Luke Jackson – Forgotten Voices
Mark Chadwick (Levellers)  –  No Change
Emily Barker – Doing The Best I can
Moulettes – Lullaby
Lucy Ward – Bigger Than That
The Jamie Freeman Agreement – Homes for Heroes
The Self Help Group  – Funeral Drum
The Dreaming Spires – Follow The Money
Mountain Firework Company – Filthy Lucre
Phil Jones (Hatful Of Rain) – New Homes
O’Hooley & Tidow – The Hum
Will Varley  – The Sound Of The Markets Crashing
Chris TT – A-Z
Plumhall – Never Forget My Name
Grace Petrie – If There’s a Fire In Your Heart
Danni Nicholls  – A Little Redemption

Buy it from https://unionmusicstore.com

Emily Barker – new album

EmilyBarker.TheToeragSessions.Packshot.1000

 Emily Barker’s new album is a collection of solo versions of her songs, recorded live to 2-track tape at Toerag Studios in London with grammy-winning producer Liam Watson (The White Stripes – Elephant).

In the album’s sleeve notes, she explains how the idea came about: “over the last few years, in between touring with my bands The Red Clay Halo and Vena Portae, I’ve played lots of solo shows. Often people will come up to me at the end of those shows and ask if there is any way to get hold of recordings of the songs as they’ve just heard them – just me, my guitar and my harmonica”.

Up until now, that hasn’t been possible, but with The Red Clay Halo currently on hiatus after their final tour last year, Emily took the opportunity to go in to the studio to record her own selection of songs from her back catalogue. Many of these songs are the ones she usually chooses to play at solo shows, with a few additions. The songs go right back to her first UK band the-low-country, through all her albums with The Red Clay Halo, and including a brand new song, ‘Anywhere Away’, written last year as the theme to the forthcoming British movie Hec McAdam (starring Peter Mullan and Keith Allen).

About Emily:

Emily Barker is the award-winning songwriter and performer of the theme to BBC TV’s Wallander starring Kenneth Branagh. Her music is a blend of roots influences from country to English folk via 60s pop, all wrapped in the rich string arrangements and multi-part vocal harmonies of The Red Clay Halo, spearheaded by Emily’s clear, expressive voice and her charismatic stage presence.

Alongside the Wallander theme, Emily has also provided the theme music to BBC TV drama The Shadow Line (which won an Ivor Novello for best TV soundtrack for series composer Martin Phipps) and has recently (in collaboration again with Martin Phipps) composed music for Daniel Barber’s The Keeping Room (Sam Worthington, Britt Marling, Hailee Steinfeld) as well as her first feature length soundtrack, for Jake Gavin’s UK road movie Hec McAdam starring Peter Mullan.

Emily’s most recent album with The Red Clay Halo, Dear River, was critically acclaimed across the board, with four and five star reviews including lead reviews in The Times and Evening Standard, alongside recognition from specialist magazines such as Maverick, R2 and Country Music People. It went on to be voted Americana album of the year by readers of the UK’s foremost roots music website, Spiral Earth, and debuted in the UK Independent Album Breakers chart at #3, spending 5 weeks in the top 20.

Introduction to The Toerag Sessions:

If you would like to order a copy of the album (in CD or Vinyl), download it or just listen to snippets of selected tracks (track previews are usually on the download page) then click on the banner link below to be taken to our associated partner Amazon’s website. Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

‘Heartfelt songwriting… bridging the gap between folk, country and Fleetwood Mac’ The Times

‘Emily Barker has a gift for great melodies’ The Guardian

‘ambitious and beautifully wrought’ Q Magazine

‘singer-songwriters are hardly an endangered species in 2013 but there should still be room for those as talented as Emily Barker’ Evening Standard

Emily Barker re-releases 2007 debut album

PFFEmily Barker – Photos.Fires.Fables.
Out 8th December

Emily Barker’s first solo album, originally released in 2007, has been repackaged in a beautiful new gatefold card sleeve, complete with all fifteen tracks from both previous versions of the album. Photos.Fires.Fables. contains some of Emily’s best loved songs, including ‘Home’, ’This Is How It’s Meant To Be’ and the original recording of ‘Fields of June’ featuring Steve Adams on vocals. Continue reading Emily Barker re-releases 2007 debut album