Le Vent du Nord – new album and UK tour

Le Vent Du Nord

Long ago, Samuel de Champlain, the French explorer of what is now Eastern Canada, had a dream: that in the new territory he had explored, all might raise their voices together, indigenous and European, of all faiths, a chorus of different perspectives, cultures, and ideas. It was a dream forgotten, deferred, but one that resonates with where Canadians find themselves now.

Le Vent du Nord, feisty torch bearers of Quebecois traditional music, bring this dream (‘Le Pays de Samuel’) and others to life on Territoires (Borealis Records) the group’s richest, most intriguing album to date. From the plight of New France (‘Louisbourg’) to progressive social changes (‘Evolution Tranquille’) a nod to the mid-century quiet revolution that led to Quebec’s rebirth, from mysterious monsters (‘Chaousaro’) to love’s yearnings (‘Le Soir Arrive’), the now five-person ensemble travels far and wide.

“We wanted to explore the quest for territories, physical or internal, or territories that don’t exist yet,” says fiddler Olivier Demers. “They are also impressions, colours and sentiments, a way of feeling, extreme joy or deep sadness.” The new album has sparked an entirely new show around these themes, a show that will be showcased at Folk Alliance International in Montreal. (the band was awarded Folk Artist of the Year at FAI in 2006!)

Le Vent du Nord’s dream has always been to bring a contemporary, highly original sensibility to the songs and melodies preserved in archives or treasured in family troves. Through thoughtful engagement with songs’ stories and artful arrangements, the ensemble pushes Quebec folk music forward, with an ear open to the world and its current travails. This means finding timely messages in long-lost tales, crafting tight and moving vocal harmonies, and getting whirling dance tunes still cherished in many towns and families to groove hard.

“We’re really added a bit of groovy stuff to this album,” says fiddler and foot tapper André Brunet, who recently joined the group after years with Quebecois legends La Bottine Souriante,“and several songs have a riff with a bouzouki and bass. We’ve left things more open, skipping the answers in the traditional call and response sections and putting a bit of effects on the lead vocal. The sound turned out really rich.”

The richness has developed noticeably over time. With nearly 2,000 concerts, two Juno Awards, hundreds of tours across the globe, and ten albums to their credit, the band has had time to come into its own. “We are proud to call ourselves an established ensemble,” says Demers. “We’re mature and are creating at the peak of our confidence and power.”

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‘Adieu Du Village’ – official video:

Tour Dates – April 2019

Thursday 4. Union Chapel  Compton Terrace, Islington, London N1 2XD
Tel: 020 7226 1686 Tickets £18.00 — Doors 7:00 p.m.

Friday 5. Mid Border Arts Market Hall & Assembly Rooms, Broad Street, Presteigne, Powys, Wales LD8 2AD
Tel: 01544 267163   Tickets £12.00 — Doors 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 6. Liverpool Philharmonic Hall (Music Room) Hope Street, Liverpool, Merseyside L1 9BP
Tel: 0151 709 3789 Tickets £21.00 & £19.00 Doors 7:30 p.m.

Sunday 7. The Stoller Hall Hunts Bank, Manchester, Greater Manchester M3 1DA
Tel: 0333 130 0967 Tickets £20.00 — Doors 7:30

Tuesday 9. East Riding Theatre 10 Lord Roberts Rd, Beverley, Yorkshire HU17 9BE
Tel: 01482 874050 Tickets £17.00 — Doors 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 10. Djanogly Theatre Nottingham Lakeside Arts, University Park, Nottingham, E. Midlands NG7 2RD
Tel: 0115 846 7777 Tickets £18.00 — Doors 7:30 p.m.

Thursday 11. The Sage St Mary’s Square, Gateshead Quays, Gateshead, Tyne & Wear NE8 2JR
Tel: 0191 443 4661 Tickets £17.40 — Doors 7:30 p.m.

Friday 12. Saltaire Live Victoria Hall, Victoria Rd, Saltaire, Shipley, W. Yorkshire BD18 3JS
Tel: 0113 245 5570 £18.00 — Doors 7:15 p.m.

Saturday 13. Guildhall Arts Centre St Peter’s Hill, Grantham, Lincolnshire NG31 6PZ
Tel: 01476 406158 Tickets £15.00 — Doors 7:30 p.m.

Sunday 14. Hazlitt Theatre 36 Earl St, Maidstone, Kent ME14 1PP
Tel: 01622 758611 Tickets £15.50 — Doors 7:30 p.m.

SINGLES BAR 37 – The year’s final round-up of EPs and singles

Singles Bar 37Together We’re Lost is the latest EP from Brighton’s JACKO HOOPER. Its themes are frustration and loneliness, appropriate to the time of year some might say. The lead track, ‘Sidelines’, starts out starkly with Jacko’s voice sounding oddly sinister but it is built up by producer Josh Trinnaman’s electronica band Luo. ‘Trust In Me Always’ finds Josh being swallowed up by the band at the end and ‘The Long Road’ is bleak and echoey but with a sumptuous arrangement over acoustic guitar closing with synthesised brass. Finally, ‘I’m Yours’ begins with Jacko talking on his phone over keyboards which take him into the song. This is a fascinating, haunting collection of songs.
https://jackohooper.bandcamp.com/

NICHOLAH comes originally from Cumbria but, like all young, aspiring artists, she is settled in London. ‘Waiting On You’ is her new single – a song that has been compared to Joni Mitchell’s ‘A Case Of You’ – a song of love that seems just out of reach. Nicholah plays mighty steel-strung guitar that reflects Mitchell’s dulcimer just a little and she has a voice that is powerful enough to carry any song.
www.nicolahmusic.com

DAVID GUNAWARDANA hails from Hertfordshire and derives his songs from the acoustic traditions on both sides of the Atlantic. His debut EP, Figures & Faces, to be released in a couple of weeks, showcases his varied styles from the short orchestral opener, ‘Calling’ to the stripped back simplicity of ‘The Sages’. ‘Where She Walks’ is particularly pretty and the acoustic guitar behind ‘Evening Song’ nods its head to early Bob Dylan. David seems able to create his own mythology and draw the listener into his own travels.
www.davidgunawardana.com

‘Love Is Hard Enough Without The Winter’ is a new single from LUKE SITAL-SINGH who has just completed a short European tour. Gently reverbed guitar and minimal percussion support a clear, fresh voice and a contrasting solo on the bass strings. Its melancholy lyrics open with a startling couplet that sounds almost sinister at first.
www.lukesitalsingh.com

Quebecois funsters LE VENT DU NORD release a new single, ‘Adieu Du Village’, a traditional song about a man who kills his lover but is spared when the hangman’s rope breaks. It’s packed with foot percussion, fiddle, bouzouki and a pulsing Jew’s harp. Nicolas Boulerice provided a new tune and the band have a new album and UK tour next year.
https://leventdunord.com/en/

CAFÉ SPICE are a young female harmony trio from Manchester and ‘Lauren’ is their debut single. Their original composition begins in a capella style before acoustic guitar leads in other instruments and before you know it they’re going for a big finish. A name to watch, we think.
https://www.facebook.com/cafespiceband/

‘The Story Is…’ is the title track of SKINNY LISTER’s forthcoming album and is a complete contrast to its predecessor, ’38 Minutes’. Pretty, magnificent and sweeping aren’t the sort of adjectives one would normally associate with the band but they sum up this fine song perfectly.
https://skinnylister.com/

The Folking Awards results 2018

Here they are, the results of the 2018 Folking awards. Thanks to all our writers who submitted nominations and to everyone who participated – almost 17,000 votes were cast. Every one of the nominees made an impression on our writers either on record or on stage during 2017. Without further ado, here are the top choices with percentage of the votes cast.


Soloist of the year – Richard Thompson (31.3%)

Folking Awards results

Read a short bio here (as if you really need to!).


Best Duo – Kathryn Roberts & Sean Lakeman (46%)

Read a short bio here.


Best Band – Merry Hell (35.6%)

Best Live Act – Merry Hell (32.1%)

Just in case we haven’t told you about them often enough you can read about Merry Hell here.


Best Album – Strangers by The Young’Uns (29%)

Strangers

Read Dai Jeffries’ review of Strangers here.


Best Musician – Ryan Young (35.6%)

Read Ryan’s bio here.


Rising Star Act – The Trials Of Cato (33.2%)

Read The Trials of Cato bio here.


Best International Artiste – Le Vent Du Nord (45.7%)

Photograph by Alistair Cassidy

Read Le Vent Du Nord’s bio here.


Please support us and order via our UK or US Storefront 


Click banner above to order featured CD/ Vinyl/ Download/ Book/ DVD
Physical link for the UK Store is: https://folking.com/folking-store/


Click banner above to order featured CD/ Vinyl/ Download/ Book/ DVD
Physical link to the US Storehttps://folking.com/folking-us-storefront/


Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

The 2018 Folking Awards

Welcome to the 2018 Folking Awards and thank you again to everyone who participated last year. The nominations, in eight categories, come from our ever-expanding team of writers and were wrangled into shape with considered argument and arm-wrestling by the Folkmeister and the Editor.

There are five nominees in each category, all of whom have impressed our writers during 2017.

As with the format last year, all are winners in our eyes, as are quite a few who didn’t make the short list. However, it’s not just down to what we think, so again, there will be a public vote to decide the overall winner of each category.

*The Public Vote for each category will close at 9.00pm on Sunday 1st April (GMT+1).


Soloist Of The Year

 Jon Boden
Ange Hardy
Daria Kulesh
Richard Thompson
Chris Wood


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Best Duo

Kate & Raphael
O’Hooley & Tidow
Kathryn Roberts & Sean Lakeman
Laura Smyth & Ted Kemp
Winter Wilson


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Best Band

Sam Kelly & The Lost Boys
Merry Hell
Peter Knight’s Gigspanner
Police Dog Hogan
The Unthanks


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Best Live Act

CC Smugglers
Eliza Carthy & The Wayward Band
Fairport Convention
Lau
Merry Hell


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Best Album

Bring Back Home – Ange Hardy
Pretty Peggy – Sam Kelly & The Lost Boys
Long Lost Home – Daria Kulesh
A Pocket Of Wind Resistance – Karine Polwart/Pippa Murphy
Strangers – The Young ‘Uns


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Best Musician

Kevin Crawford
Seth Lakeman
Richard Thompson
Karen Tweed
Ryan Young


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Rising Star

Sam Brothers
Siobhan Miller
Jack Rutter
Sound Of The Sirens
The Trials Of Cato


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!!

 


Best International Artist

Rodney Crowell
Anna Coogan
Michael McDermott
Le Vent Du Nord
The Wailin’ Jennys


Public Vote

*And the winner is: Open envelope!

 


Please support us and order via our UK or US Storefront 


Click banner above to order featured CD/ Vinyl/ Download/ Book/ DVD
Physical link for the UK Store is: https://folking.com/folking-store/


Click banner above to order featured CD/ Vinyl/ Download/ Book/ DVD
Physical link to the US Storehttps://folking.com/folking-us-storefront/


Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

Folkies 2018

LE VENT DU NORD live at South Hill Park, Bracknell

Le Vent Du Nord
Photograph by Dai jeffries

Smoke swirled over the darkened stage as four shadowy figures took their places. The sound began with the drone of a hurdy-gurdy, joined by fiddle, jew’s harp and voice and lastly bouzouki. Finally the lights came up to reveal Le Vent Du Nord in all their splendour. It was an uncharacteristically sombre opening to an evening that was full of laughs.

I usually come home from a gig with a fairly accurate set-list and other notes about who did what. No chance here. The band only introduced a few of their pieces and then usually in rapid French. I fell back on plan B and tried to blag a set-list from keyboardist Nicolas Boulerice but they don’t use one. He did offer to write one up for me, though, and that’s not an offer you get every day. They did tell us that most of the material would come from their most recent album, Têtu, as did ‘Confédération’, the first song they announced by name, having a dig at Anglophone Canadians in the process.

In fact, the announcements in the first half took the form of a debate, which apparently the band had, about whether Têtu should have a terminal “s”. Everyone had to have a say in turn and the running joke got funnier and funnier. I did figure out the unaccompanied ‘La March Des Iroquois’ and ‘Petit Rêve IX’, an almost orchestral piece which begins with a lovely guitar solo played by its composer, fiddler Olivier Demers and they closed the first set with an oldie, ‘Lanlaire’.

Several things stuck in the mind after the gig. The first is the interplay of the four voices. They can stack up harmonies, pick up lines from each other and occasionally sing over each other. The second is that they do the same with melodies, passing a tune from fiddle to melodeon, to hurdy-gurdy and even jew’s harp. Finally comes the energy and fun they bring to their music. Quebecois music is, to say the least, lively and they throw everything they have into it. I was surprised that Demers, who is responsible for most of the foot percussion, was still standing at the end.

The second set opened with ‘Le Cœur De Ma Mère’ and the time just flew past. There was a bizarre moment when Demers played us a country song in French – from his iPhone – before the band sang an unaccompanied and rather more stately version. ‘Forillon’ is one of their more serious songs and they did it full justice. This isn’t a history lesson but you should look up the story. Nico introduced a song with a long, involved story about a song he found in his attic in a hand-written manuscript, learned it and performed it in France only to be told that it was a famous Parisian song that may have derived from mediaeval English. It seems that his “manuscript” was probably copied down from the radio! It was a love song but Nico neglected to name it.

Le Vent Du Nord
Photograph by Dai Jeffries

After a wild instrumental finish, they encored with the traditional ‘Vive L’Amour’ and another unaccompanied and unannounced song – perhaps I should have taken Nico up on his offer. Their performance richly deserved the standing ovation and the cheers they received. Do try to hear them while they are on tour here.

Dai Jeffries

Artists’ website: https://leventdunord.com/en/

We’re spoiling you now – four live songs from Le Vent Du Nord:

BREABACH – Astar (Breabach BRE004CD)

BREABACH AstarWith most albums it’s good to have the sleeve notes to hand when listening. With Breabach’s sixth outing an atlas is just as important. Astar means distance or journey in Gaelic and the musical ideas are drawn from all round the world.

The album opens with ‘The Midnight Sun’ written by piper James Duncan Mackenzie and inspired by a visit he paid to Tromso to run a marathon on midsummers day when the sun never actually sets. It begins with an oddly oriental sound, presumably an attempt to imitate the sound of a kantele. That is followed by a set of three compositions inspired by the rhythms of the Haka. The parts of ‘Muriwai’ are written by Calum MacCrimmon, Scott Morrison and Mackenzie.

There is brief return to Scotland with Dick Gaughan’s ‘Outlaws And Dreamers’ before we’re off to Scandinavia again with ‘Farsund’, the title track of the medley being composed by Megan Henderson. The third part of the medley is the first traditional tune on the album, ‘Wee Totum Fog’, which itself has an interesting history. ‘Mo Thruaighe Leir Thu ‘Ille Bhuidhe’ gives Megan her first lead vocal of the collection and then we’re off again, this time to Australia. ‘The White Sands Of Jervis Bay’ begins with a ceremonial song from the Aborigine tradition called ‘Guka Manikay’ while MacCrimmon and Mackenzie composed the title piece. It’s interesting to note that no-one seems to have come up with a more politically correct term for the original inhabitants of Australia.

‘Les Pieds Joyeaux’ is inspired by the Quebeçois tradition even though the tunes themselves are Scottish – Le Vent Du Nord join Breabach on vocals for this one. Then there is a visit to the Hebrides for a waulking song and a tune inspired by the waulking rhythm. It would be appropriate to stay in Scotland now but Ewan Robertson’s ‘Ribbon Of Fire’ is a song inspired by the band’s tour of the antipodes and ‘The Last March’ takes us to Cape Breton.

Astar is an album full of musical imagery and imagination – a melting pot of ideas that is varied and satisfying. This could be Beabach’s best.

Dai Jeffries

Please support us and order via our UK or US Storefront 


Click banner above to order featured CD/ Vinyl/ Download/ Book/ DVD
Physical link for the UK Store is: https://folking.com/folking-store/


Click banner above to order featured CD/ Vinyl/ Download/ Book/ DVD
Physical link to the US Storehttps://folking.com/folking-us-storefront/


Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

Artists’ website: http://breabach.com/

Breabach live on their 2015 Highland Blast tour: