Kirsty Almeida announces new studio album

Kirsty Almeida

Singer-songwriter Kirsty Almeida is set to release Moonbird, her first studio album since 2014’s Déjàvoodu on her own independent label, All Made Up Records.

Currently living in the hills of Hebden Bridge in the North of England, the Gibraltarian returns with new creative vigour following a recording hiatus, which saw her devoting time to her young son as well as healing from PTSD and post-natal depression. Influenced by the experience of motherhood, an innate love of storytelling and affinity with the natural world, Almeida’s nine-song collection exhibits accomplished song-craft, rich arrangements and exquisite production.

The album was recorded between a variety of studios including John Ellis’ Limefield studio, George Atkins’ 80 Hertz, The Travelling Band’s Pinhole Sound, Terry Britton’s Mancave and Low Four Studios at Manchester’s Old Granada studios. The former Decca signed artist enlisted the services of Grammy award-winning engineers Jerry Boys (Buena Vista Social Club/Toumani Diabaté) and Greg Calbi (John Mayer, Norah Jones and Bon Iver) to mix and master the LP. The album cover shot was taken by iconic Rock Archive photographer Jill Furmanovsky (Bob Dylan, Bob Marley, The Clash).

“This album debuts the real me”, Almeida states, “the warrior, the artist, the wizard, the girl, the broken, the found and the re-birthed”.

With its South American flavours and huge swirling vocal and string arrangements, title track ‘Moonbird’ is a work of art. Kirsty pulls out the musical stops with its 5/4 time signature and it is hypnotic, while ‘I’m Going To Love You’ encapsulates the sound of the New Orleans saloon or Hootenanny celebration.

‘Josie Brown’, produced by BBC lifetime achievement award-winning Bill Leader, is a blue and uplifting first-person account of an elderly childhood mentor. It captures the warmth of Kirsty’s voice and guitar playing, embellished with dustings of acoustic piano and delicately placed strings which elevate the humble song to glorious heights. Hearing it for the first time, musician and producer Martin Glover, aka.Youth, commented: ‘If that’s a true story she’s an incredible songwriter and if it’s not, she’s a f**king genius.’ When prolific award-winning songwriter Guy Chambers heard Kirsty sing Josie Brown live by chance he asked her to collaborate with him on a song.

Kirsty’s love of 19th century parlour guitars also informs her songwriting. The instruments were crafted for women to entertain in the parlors. The smaller body was designed to fit the petite frame of women at the time, reflecting femininity. They lend what Kirsty terms an “indescribable magic” to songs like ‘You Make My Heart’. Parlor guitars aren’t the only captivating stringed instruments in use, however, as John Haycock’s West African kora adds light, regal melodies to the subtly arranged ‘Into The Light’, while a lilting, shimmering electric guitar played by guitar master, Billy Buckley, underpins the sweet and soulful ‘Find Your Way’.

 “I am so thankful to the musicians who made this album with me,” Almeida professes. “They poured their beautiful musicality into the album and helped me build my wings with their encouragement. I am more me than I ever have been and this album is my most honest offering to date.”

The singer, who gave the world a wondrous collection of Winter Songs, here eschews the darkness of wintertide, bringing light and positivity to the fore. “I feel like the last five years of my life was a journey into the darkest places in me,” Kirsty explains, “bringing light to the most painful places I never even knew existed ‘till post-natal depression and PTSD cracked me open, so I could become the best version of me. I am now healthier and happier than I ever was before and I have such a new appreciation of music and my relationship with it.”

Artist’s website: www.kirstyalmeida.co.uk

‘Into The Light’:

BRIDGET ST JOHN – DANDELION ALBUMS AND BBC COLLECTION (CHERRY RED RECORDS CRCDMBOX 17)

BStJOften described as obscure yet she worked with John Martyn, Mike Oldfield, Kevin Ayers, and Mike Chapman, championed by John Peel (as the leading female singer-songwriter) and even Terry Wogan, during four well-received albums. And that was just in the 1970s. It’s interesting—and crucial regarding career—that Bridget St John was Dandelion Records first-ever signing and release, when folk’s second wave was rolling via Island in England and (Dandelion’s distributor) Elektra in USA. If Dandelion evolved around their first signing, hindsight and eclecticism suggest differently. The DJ said that “the main reason why we started the label was nobody else was going to record her stuff” – not Elektra, Island, or even the fledgling Apple?

Dandelion was a co-operative where artists had creative control, but when it folded in 1973 (“like a family break-up” St John recalled) the ethos was rare and tastes mutating. There was no Plan B. After John Peel’s death this has been accentuated by the sale of their publishing to a conglomerate, against Dandelion’s principles and a nightmare for those of its roster still active. (It would be even worse if Cherry Red Records didn’t exist.) These origins have put a particular spin on their careers, perhaps contributing to major labels’ lack of keenness and thus the obscurity tag.

Her first demo was made at Al Stewart’s home, thanks to her guitar mentor John Martyn. A boyfriend gave it to Peel at a gig, and within three weeks debuted on Night Ride in August ’68. That distant session is on this box-set at an almost-equally amazing budget price. The three LPs are on replica-label discs, plus singles, Montreux 1972, and a CD of (mostly wiped) BBC sessions 1968-1972. The latter was on a double some years ago, as was Montreux (on Thank You For…also from Cherry Red), but are here in context. It was this radio material, based on solid albums and gigging—like the Dandelion Euro tour sponsored by Polydor with Medicine Head, Beau and Kevin Coyne—that attracted a loyal following.

In a cover reminiscent of legendary folk labels—minimalist but evocative with her picture when a baby – Ask Me No Questions (1969) was produced by Peel in one ten-hour session at CBS Studios with Simon Stable on bongos, John Martyn and Richard Sanders on guitars. The seven-minute title track in doubled vocals of “Ask me no questions, tells me no lies”, with Peel ransacking the library for bird song and bells, is pure Dandelion and ’69. Still played live connecting her to the Dandelion people she says, it was one of the first tunings learned from Martyn. It opens with her recent debut single, the bass-string driven ‘To B Without A Hitch’ about France while enjoying “buttercup sandwiches”.  ‘Autumn Lullaby’ lilts through childhood memories of Richmond Park, ‘Curl Your Toes’ tells a by-the-fireside tale, ‘Barefoot And Hot Pavements’ about city wandering, and among the twin guitars one of her most beautiful songs, ‘Hello Again (Of Course)’. There’s even psych without the electricity, a plucking delight (‘The Curious Crystals Of Unusual Purity’). Appended from 45s are Cohen’s ‘Suzanne’ and ‘The Road Was Lonely’, a hypnotic ballad with rare backing harmony.

Peel called her voice and songs “full of woods and hedgerows, startled deer and hedgehogs”, and the rustic imagery and free-wheeling acoustic dexterity is a timeless debut. Songs For The Gentle Man (1971) came from November-December sessions costing £2,000 at Sound Techniques, also used by Fairport Convention and Drake. Produced by Ron Geesin, fresh from Pink Floyd’s Atom Heart Mother, he contributed organ (for Martyn’s ‘Back To Stay’), Sanders returning on guitar, with a chamber ensemble including brass giving a lusher effect. Looking more like an Edwardian muse than a hippy in Kensington Gardens with the photographer’s hound on the gatefold, scenes are woven tapestry-like from another mansion room: ‘A Day A Way’ with jangly guitar/flute/oboe about a seaside day trip, subtle echo-reverb (‘Early Morning Song’), while Donovan’s ‘The Pebble And The Man’ sounds like her own. Absences of people and places, time shared or alone, but it’s not melancholy (the closer’s 40 seconds is about growing into the loved person). Politics are outside her remit but it’s her most confessional LP. Some were ready for her debut as they’re on her January 1969 radio session.

The third disc mirrors Cherry Red’s 2005 release of Thank You For… (July 1972) with a full April ’72 Swiss concert. Here reprised is the MCA 1973 A-side ‘Passing Thru’ (from Leonard Cohen’s own cover on his first live LP), produced by Mike Chapman but uncredited when he rescued its shambolic session. (She guests on his Deal Gone Down the next year.) The Beeb played it a couple of times then decided it was too depressing! With Jerry Boys for co-production, the folk-rock sports the impressive cast of Tim Renwick and Quiver, Andy Roberts (Liverpool Scene, Plainsong, uncredited Beatles sessions), Gordon Huntley (Matthews Southern Comfort), Pip Pyle, Dave Mattacks, Rick Kemp, Sanders, and Martyn. Hand-picked for each song, a spontaneous spark with very few overdubs shines through. ‘Nice’ was on Polydor b/w ‘Goodbaby Goodbye’ about a break-up “at the end of time”; ‘Every Day’ is Buddy Holly with a missing chord! The anti-lynching ‘Lazarus’ (still played with added guitar-thumping) is from early influence Buffy St. Marie’s Many A Mile, and a dreamier version of Dylan’s ‘Love Minus Zero/No Limit’. ‘Fly High’ should’ve charted with its big production, ironically about the music biz (“So please remember all you have and not what you might lose, it isn’t always easy but is better when you do”).

The Montreux concert with Sanders features live premieres of the album, introduced in fluent French, including a hypnotic ‘Fly High’, and a faster ‘Ask Me No Questions’. A visual example is on YouTube from French TV in May 1970. The 19-track BBC disc has an amusing/awful interview with Peel, covers of Martyn, sitar-style guitar Donovan, Joni Mitchell, unreleased songs, and a 1971 In Concert duet with the late Kevin Ayers from their unfinished children’s songs. Her 1970 B-side of his ‘Yep’ is oddly omitted. She contributed to his Shooting At The Moon (1970) with Mike Oldfield (she’s on his Ommadawn and Amarok), and The Unfairground (2007).

After Chrysalis stymied Jumble Queen 1974 (reissued by Beat Goes On), when a ‘Melody Maker’ poll that year rated her fifth best female singer (Maggie Bell was number 1, Shirley Bassey number 9), she emigrated to Greenwich Village where she lives today. From buttercup sandwiches to fast food, it seems a little ironical as she never saw herself in England’s folk scene. A rare recent glimpse is an interview/performance on the excellent TV station of Cherry Red who also released a 19-track sampler (2010, CDMRED440).

“I’m not a narrative songwriter, I don’t sit down to write stories, I just write feelings out,” getting “high off people, ideas and things”. Voice, instrument and lyric allow a place and air for later listening. It doesn’t date, a beguiling delivery of observation and experience tinged with her favourite autumn and nostalgia-driven Englishness swirls like labelmate Beau with a pinch of John Martyn and dash of Donovan. Narrowly missing fame, this is supplanted by cult status more suiting her low profile. This box-set brings dispatches from a more innocent age, when communication meant exactly that and not technology, a time not just to listen but hear. Once heard, never forgotten.

Brian R Banks

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‘Nice’ – The Old Grey Whistle Test.

Sam Amidon releases Bright Sunny South on May 13 2013

sam amidonTo coincide with the release of his Nonesuch Records debut, Sam Amidon will play a show at Bush Hall in London on May 23.

Nonesuch Records releases the new album, Bright Sunny South, on May 13. Produced by Amidon with his childhood friend and longtime collaborator Thomas Bartlett (a.k.a. Doveman) and legendary English engineer Jerry Boys (Buena Vista Social Club, Vashti Bunyan, R.E.M.) and recorded in London, the record features a band made up of Bartlett and multi-instrumentalists Shahzad Ismaily and Chris Vatalaro. Jazz trumpeter Kenny Wheeler also makes a cameo. Amidon himself not only sings but also plays banjo, fiddle, acoustic guitar, and piano on the album. It includes the single ‘My Old Friend’, which is featured below.

Amidon describes Bright Sunny South as a “a lonesome record” and a return to the more spare sound of his 2007 self-recorded debut, But This Chicken Proved Falsehearted: “There was an atmospheric quality to my last two records; those albums are like a garden of sounds,” says Amidon, “but this one is more of a journey, a winding path. The band comes rushing in and then they disappear. It comes from more of a darker, internal space.” A longtime admirer of Boys’ work, Amidon was particularly enamoured of his recordings with Martin Carthy in the 1970s, as well as the Ali Farka Touré/Toumani Diabaté duet albums on World Circuit/Nonesuch: “Those are so beautiful. I listened to all of that. I loved the sense of documentation, the unadorned quality. Everything sounded so clear.”

The Vermont-born and raised, London-based Amidon is known for his reworking of traditional melodies into a new form. In addition to country ballads and shape-note hymns, Bright Sunny South features interpretations of traditional and contemporary songs, including Tim McGraw’s ‘My Old Friend’ and Mariah Carey’s ‘Shake It Off’. The record also includes a version of ‘Weeping Mary’, a shape-note hymn that his parents, Peter and Mary Alice Amidon, had recorded with the Vermont-based Word of Mouth Chorus for Nonesuch Records on the 1977 disc Rivers of Delight: American Folk Hymns From the Sacred Harp Tradition.

Bright Sunny South follows 2010’s critically acclaimed I See the Sign, which earned Amidon praise from SPIN for his ‘Quirky alchemy…contrasting pretty sounds with violent lyrical undercurrents’

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In addition to his solo albums, Amidon has collaborated on performances pieces with musical polymath Nico Muhly, toured as part of Thomas Bartlett’s group Doveman and the Brooklyn band Stars Like Fleas, collaborated with Beth Orton, and embarked on a series of live shows with the guitarist Bill Frisell.

Artist’s website: www.samamidon.com