PHIL ODGERS & BOBBY VALENTINO – live

Live at The Slaughtered Lamb, 34 Great Sutton St, Clerkenwell, London EC1V 0DX

Saturday 28th April 2018

Phil Odgers
Photograph by Dai Jeffries

Hot on the heels of his critically acclaimed ‘partial’ autobiography Tales From The Tracks, knock out album Roll To The Left and sold out UK tour, Phil ‘Swill’ Odgers rides into town with the larger than life Bobby Valentino playing some mean violin alongside him.

Founder member and one half of the joint vocal strike force of the inimitable The Men They Couldn’t Hang, Phil “Swill” Odgers is a well loved and prolific solo artist in his own right. Audiences around the world from Cairo to Reykjavik, Brisbane to Tokyo, and Berlin to London have succumbed to his effervescent and heartfelt vocal style.

A fine acoustic guitarist, singer and songwriter, his influences are far-reaching, ranging from his Scottish roots, through 50’s/60’s rock ‘n’ roll, punk, folk and country. Phil Odgers is a sorely undervalued national treasure!

His latest solo album, the highly regarded Roll To The Left, brings his song writing prowess into sharp, bright, focus. Lyrically this is a collection of unique tales with cinematic imagery – from kitchen sink realism and social commentary to Technicolor splendour. The album was recorded in the studio built for Kirsty MacColl by Steve Lillywhite (where she recorded ‘Fairytale Of New York’). Phil was privileged to record the album using to 3 very special acoustic guitars – one previously owned by Kirsty MacColl, one by Joe Strummer and the limited black edition Martin Guitar from Johnny Cash’s personal collection. It’s no surprise then that these organic, passionate and spirited sessions resulted in a magical and deeply accomplished record.

At this very special performance at the extremely fine Slaughtered Lamb in London EC1 you will have the opportunity to hear songs from this album, along with favourites from Phil’s back catalogue and even some TMTCH classics.

To make the gig even more special Phil will be accompanied by renegade virtuoso Bobby Valentino on fiddle.

Bobby Valentino:

The man who co-wrote and played violin on The Bluebells ‘Young at Heart’, Bobby has played on records by Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, The Alabama 3 and Paul Weller to name but a few.

He has also contributed to many recordings by The Men They Couldn’t Hang as well as frequently appearing with them on stage.

Bobby’s vocal talents are demonstrated on his solo albums ‘This is Murder’ and ‘Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake’ both of which will be on sale on the night.

Phil ‘Swill’ Odgers and Bobby Valentino – what a combination!!

The Slaughtered Lamb

If you like your gigs acoustic, it doesn’t get much better than at the Slaughtered Lamb. The room’s big enough to create an atmosphere, but the corner stage, which places the performers at eye level with the audience, makes for one of the most intimate musical experiences in London. It’s why American musicians will travel here for a single gig, and why it’s a great place to meet and mingle with fellow folk-lovers. Sure, it’s a pain if you’re there on a night when it’s standing-room only and you can’t see much. But the opportunity to have a drink with the band upstairs after the gig – most musicians can be found there post-performance – more than makes up for it.

Artist’s website: www.swillodgers.co.uk

Swill and Valentino to reunite on tour in April

PHIL ‘SWILL’ ODGERS
& BOBBY VALENTINO
April 2018 Tour
Never the same set twice!

The Men They Couldn’t Hang singer-songwriter Phil ‘Swill Odgers and roots fiddle supremo Bobby Valentino hit the road in April for a duo tour that’s selling fast.

Confirmed dates so far…

Sat 7th Sheffield Heeley Institute, 147 Gleadless Rd, Sheffield S2 3AF Tickets
Wed 11th Bristol Thunderbolt, 124 Bath Rd, Bristol BS4 3ED Tickets
Thurs 12th Birmingham Kitchen Garden Café, 17 York Rd, B14 Tickets
Fri 13th Lowton Social Club, 214 Newton Road Lowton, WA3 2AQ (Tickets are only available via email to gordongigshaw@aol.com)
Sat 14th Newcastle, Cobalt Studios, Boyd St, NE21AP Tickets
Sun 15th Durham: Old Cinema Launderette, DH1 2HX Tickets
Fri 20th Edinburgh: The Speakeasy, The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, EH2 2AA Tickets
Sat 28th London: The Slaughtered Lamb, 34-35 Great Sutton St, Clerkenwell, London EC1V 0DX http://www.wegottickets.com/event/427966

Artist Web Link: https://philodgers.bandcamp.com/

Wickham Festival 2015 – Reviewed by Simon Burch

Click on the photo below to see the full set…

Wickham 2015

Staged in a corn field and with three stages linked by alleyways of food and crafts stalls, Wickham proved to be a good nursery slope for my family of first-time festival goers: no intimidating vast crowds and a relaxed atmosphere which built steadily through what turned out to be some swelteringly hot days.

showofhands_wickham15Musically, in the main All Time Grates big top stage it was folk with a twist of vintage pop and rock: from crowd-pleasing sets by folk stars such as Seth Lakeman, Show of Hands, Eliza Carthy, Lisbee Stainton and Martin Carthy to The South – Beautiful South survivors Dave Hemmingway and Alison Wheeler – 10CC, Billy Bragg, Cockney Rebel, Wilko Johnson and The Proclaimers.

Crowd_Wickham15The crowd was an eclectic mix of folk devotees and commuter belt families, but overall the demographic was mature and knowledgeable so that at times the main stage had the contented air of a cricket match, with festival goers seated sensibly underneath sun-hats on folding chairs, sipping real ale and completing sudokus to the sound of music.

Giants@WickhamI soon found out that for a parent festivals have to be enjoyed in the round. My children weren’t there for the music, but found instead joy in the laser quest – a shoot-‘em-up inside a series of sweaty, dark inflatable tunnels – the solar-powered Groovy Movie cinema and the digital funfair, a quirky installation where gamers played Space Invaders while sitting on a stationary bike or racked up high scores by slapping two headless mannequins on their plastic buttocks in time to music.

Playbus_Wickham15After a while it became possible to enjoy the music while waiting for them to complete their activities or resisting their pleas to spend the GDP of a small country in the various food and craft stalls, simply via the proximity to the three stages, especially the acoustic stage, where a varied line-up of young up-and-comers and older veterans strummed, picked and twanged their way skilfully through a mixture of their own material and interpretations of popular classics, finding favour with a sprinkling of punters lounging back on the straw-coated ground.

At the top of the festival was the sweatier and rockier Bowman Ales Stage 2 tent – which hosted performances from Edward II, headlining prog rockers Stone Cold and Damn Beats – but I confess that, as a first-timer wanting to immerse myself in folk my visits there were fleeting so I concentrated on the main stage, where a succession of acts filled the afternoons and evenings with musical stories from every corner of Britain and beyond.

SpookyMen_Wickham15From the lilting Northumberland romance of Kathryn Tickell and the Side, to the seasoned yarns of Huw Williams and Maartin Allcock and the acapella oddness of the Spooky Men’s Chorale, it is fair to say there was something for everyone’s tastes, but the big top came into its own later on as the sun dipped behind the food stalls and the headliners took to the stage.

BillyBragg_Wickham15Among the highlights was the life-affirming return to action of Wilko Johnson, the welcome familiarity of The (Beautiful) South’s hits and the appearance of Billy Bragg, whose wit and political zeal brought Friday night to a close. The next night, Seth Lakeman gave a rollicking masterclass of modern folk rock, sweeping the audience along and raising the temperature in the big top.

Proclaimers2_Wickham15Despite the passing of years, festival headliners The Proclaimers hadn’t seemingly aged that much and their set was a polished resounding collection of love songs, devoted to Scotland as much as to the objects of their desire. The large TV screens showed that the Reid twins had their committed fans who knew all of Proclaimers1_Wickham15the words, but as the night continued, you did get the feeling that most people in the tent were waiting for their signature tune – I Would Walk 500 Mile – like a seashore full of surfers all readying themselves for the big wave that would take them right to shore.

And, duly, at about five to 11, it arrived: cueing a joyous outburst of jigs and a singalong in affected Scottish accents. This provided the most exuberant moment of the weekend, before it drew to a close with a thank you and good night, and the boys left the stage.

The third night was over, but the next day the sun again rose hot and strong. Family holiday commitments meant I had to slip away early, but in my absence the crowds returned with their chairs and sun hats, eager for more.

Simon Burch – 23 August 2015