More names for Maverick Festival

Maverick Festival

Celebrating its 12th anniversary as the UK’s first and finest Americana festival, Maverick Festival returns on July 5th – 7th, and we are pleased to announce new additions to this years line up.

Set amongst the picturesque Victorian farm buildings of Easton Farm Park, the site is nestled deep in the Suffolk countryside, yet only two hours from London. The three day festival presents music performances, film and workshops and features over forty different artists, across six stages indoors and out.

Maverick Festival is renowned for spotting rising stars and getting there first:showcasing the most authentic and talented musicians from both sides of the Atlantic. Over the past decade, organisers have stuck to what they believe in, presenting exciting and inspiring line-ups year after year.

“This year we are pushing the musical boundaries of Americana even further with the addition of some classic Cajun and a Friday night focus on bluegrass.” – Paul Spencer – Curator

This year Maverick Festival will be celebrating bluegrass on the Friday night, with performances from Old Crow Medicine show’s Chance McCoy, Lowly Strung and Philadelphia’s Man About A Horse. Saturday’s programme will include a celebration of the protest song, introduced by the comedian / musician Rich Hall who will also present his celebrated Hoe-down.

Other additions to the festival line-up include London based five-piece Dana Immanuel & The Stolen Band; a banjo-whacking, guitar-shredding, fiddle-sawing, foot-stomping, whiskey-soaked, all-female outfit! Since 2014, they have been delighting crowds spanning the blues, rock, Americana, indie, folk and country scenes with their high-energy live show and utterly unique brand of musical badassery. We also welcome the return of Muscle Shoals native Hannah Aldridge, the queen of southern gothic rock.

The sun always shines and the music is magic. Come talent spotting at Maverick 2019 – we have a lot to live up to!

As well as the musical talent, the festival also features a spacious campsite, bell tent meadow and tipi village, as well as a carefully selected range of delicious foodstands catering to meat-eaters, vegetarians and vegans alike. pizza, paella and pasta, Mexican chilli, duck pancakes & crepes, hog-roast and hand-made burgers, all washed down with freshly squeezed lemonade & freshly ground coffee, local Suffolk cider and a selection of regional ales, wine and craft beers including the Big Drop Brewery‘s award winning non-alcoholic pale ale.

Also new this year, festival organisers have teamed with the One boxed water company to ensure the festival is plastic bottle-free!

AGS CONNOLLY // AMY LOTT // BROKEN BONES MATILDA // BROKEN ISLANDS // CHANCE MCCOY// COPPER VIPER // DANA IMMANUEL & THE STOLEN BAND // DANIEL KEMISH // DON GALLARDO // DREW YOUNG // FIRE IN THE MEADOW HALLELUJA TRAILS // HANNAH ALDRIDGE // IMOGEN CLARKE // JD HOBSON // KENNY ROBY //  KEV WATFORD & KELLY BAYFIELD // LACHLAN BRYAN & THE WILDES // LILLY WINWOOD // LUNCH SPECIAL //
MAN ABOUT A HORSE //
MARY ELAINE JENKINS // MASSY FERGUSON //
NO COWARD SOUL // NORTON MONEY //
RACHEL HARRINGTON // RESONANT ROGUES //
RICH HALL // ROBBIE CAVANAGH // SARAH SAVOY//
THE BLACK FEATHERS // THE BOMBADILS //
THE BROTHER BROTHERS // THE CRUX //
THE HENRY BROTHERS // THE LOWLY STRUNG // VINCENT CROSS…and more

Tickets

Ranger £110.00
Weekend ticket with admission to all stages and includes up to TWO nights camping Friday and Saturday

Juniper £50.00
Weekend ticket with or without camping for 16-18 year olds.

Wrangler £85.00
Weekend ticket with admission to all stages No Camping

Rustler £50.00
Day ticket, Saturday only

Nighthawk £30.00
Friday night only

Holy Roller £25.00
Sunday only
Tenderfoot £25.00

Children 10-15 yrs, under 10’s go free

Festival website: www.maverickfestival.co.uk

CAMBRIDGE CITY ROOTS FESTIVAL – Various artists/venues, 22 February – 6 March 2018

Cambridge City Roots Festival
Matt Hammond photographed by Su O’Brien

The City Roots Festival shakes open its umbrella (and hauls on its snow boots) for a second year of folk and roots events. As before, a loose collection of venues and artists are brought under the festival banner, from the already-scheduled to the specially commissioned.

New this year is an extended, two-week timespan. With something happening just about every evening and a few of the daytimes too, is there enough to keep fans busy? Well, it is hard to imagine it being a destination for the whole festival fortnight. But for those within travelling distance (admittedly a pretty wide area) – or those who don’t enjoy the whole festival experience – coming along to individual events seems to work well enough. The potential downside of this is that it tends to favour bigger names who might be touring here anyway. The challenge remains, as ever, to expose upcoming acts to wider audiences.

Inevitably, it’s also harder to keep up continuity across a multi-venue, multiple day festival. Branding is generally more visible this year, which is a definite plus. Some of the artists, though, seem barely aware that they are part of the festival – at least they don’t mention it. In fact, one act, busy lamenting a lack of inclusion (so far) in the summer Cambridge Folk Festival schedule, seems blissfully unaware that they are part of the winter one!

Last year’s closing acts, Sona Jobarteh and Muntu Valdo open the festival this time, bringing welcome African warmth. Haitian voudou from Chouk Bwa Libète goes head to head with a live interview at the University Union with Wilko Johnson. Other acts featuring in the main line-up include Megson, Tom Robinson, Rich Hall, Wildwood Kin and Ward Thomas. As with traditional festivals, there are overlaps, forcing a decision about which act to see!

Although headline acts have been flagged up for some time, a lot more, smaller, ‘fringe’ gigs are still being announced right up to the last minute. This means keeping in constant contact with the website is essential, to pick up on late changes. A lot of the smaller events are admirably free of charge too, cementing the impression of a confident local music-making community.

A family fun day at the Guildhall hosts live acts, children’s activities and a well-attended ukulele workshop. It’s heartening to see so many youngsters taking up their brightly coloured ukes. The downside is that they missed out on a superbly intimate follow-up gig by Muntu Valdo in the hall next door.

In this vast space, his tiny colourfully-dressed figure is surrounded by pedals, coaxing unexpected sounds from his guitars and building up intricate loops. He delivers an impeccable slide blues with an unmistakeably African slant – oh, and he plays a mean harmonica, too. It’s like watching Jimi Hendrix play a Sunday afternoon tea dance: thrilling and strange. As the sun streams in through the civic stained glass, it’s tempting to run out and drag the shoppers in from the streets outside to make them listen to this highly original talent.

Barbara Wibbelmann delivers some fine a capella Gaelic songs and finishes, accompanied by Quentin Rea on guitar, with a delightful ‘La Vie En Rose’. Martin Baxter’s Alternative Arrangements lend some mid-afternoon Americana as well as an upbeat ‘John Barleycorn’. The miles of empty space between seating and stage finally makes sense as ceilidh band Frog On A Bike whip up the dancers to wrap up the afternoon.

Buskers too, are apparently abroad on this cold and sunny day but, despite several slogs around town, they remain stubbornly invisible. Only stalwart singer-songwriter Matt Hammond can be found chilling his fingers, engaging passers-by with his percussive guitar style and promoting his new single, ‘Skylines’.

One of the hazards of a winter festival is always going to be inclement weather and, as with most of the rest of the country, the big hit of snow takes its toll on players and audiences alike. Still with a few line-up tweaks, it seems that all the shows go ahead, which is very impressive.

Following an afternoon masterclass in Miller’s Music shop, CC Smugglers (currently crowdfunding their new album), squash themselves into a tiny corner of the 1815 bar on a snowy evening. Playing a relaxed, mainly acoustic set, this cheery crew deliver their own bluesy, skiffly songs with some great join-in choruses, alongside lounge standards. The keyboard player in particular brings a distinct jazz style to the set, as a small crowd of Lindy Hoppers push back the chairs to whirl around the floor.

SJ Mortimer (now also performing with Morganway) And Her Flying Pigs bring lashings of country, the monthly New Routes night at the Junction features several Americana artists, and traditional music goes on in pubs and clubs across the city. Even the serious business of making a living is once again the subject of a workshop day to encourage musicians to focus further than the next creative impulse.

With such diversity of music to choose from, with venues from snug to cavernous, seated or standing, the organisers have plainly tried to cater for many tastes within the broad spectrum of folk and roots. There is something for everyone here and, as well as the national/international artists, it’s a valuable reminder of what incredible home-grow talents exist across the Eastern region at the moment. See you in 2019!

Su O’Brien

Festival website: www.cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/cityroots

 

She doesn’t seem amused.