Tilly Moses announces her debut solo album

Tilly Moses

After coming across Tilly Moses online last year, her sound and emotive musical qualities immediately struck a chord with GingerDog Records. Since that first initial glimpse, their belief in Tilly and her music has increased two-fold and GingerDog Records are absolutely delighted to announce the release of her debut studio album Alight And Adrift.

The effortless way Tilly passionately tells stories through her music, and the unique and timeless sound of her voice, mean that this debut album is a both melodically charming and evocative at the same time. Full of twists and turns, unexpected eccentricities that push the boundaries of modern day folk music, as well as true-to-tradition elements, it all comes together to produce an authentic, clever and inspiring body of work which can stand up tall in the world of folk, but also cross-over into more mainstream mixes to introduce an entirely new audience to the world of folk music.

‘There is a depth to her distinct voice as there is to her writing, a tone that reaches beneath the surface. Tilly has set a very firm foundation with this album. With beautiful instrumentation and clever arrangements, a good mix of traditional and self-penned work and some prestigious guests, she is certainly making her intentions for a long and prosperous folk career clear with this debut.’ – Ange Hardy

While usually a solo performer, Tilly was delighted to collaborate with and be joined on the album by some exceptional talents, such as BBC Folk Award Winner Sam Kelly, BBC Jazz Award Winner and Mercury Prize Nominee Kit Downes, and the fiddle player James Delarre, from the BBC Folk Award nominated band Mawkin. Tilly was also joined by young, multi-instrumentalist and virtuoso recorder player Finn Collinson, from the rising young folk duo Shorelark, and the fantastically insightful singer/songwriter Samuel McKie.

Listening to Alight And Adrift it quickly becomes apparent that Tilly has been inspired and shaped by a wide range of talented musicians and when asked to give a little insight into this, Tilly had to say…

When I was growing up, Damien Rice’s O was played all the time in the house – I hope some of those deep cello lines and that intense passion are heard in this album; it’s certainly a homage to an incredible record. The Guillemots’ distinct weirdness and originality inspired me to try and create something unique and unafraid, as their music always was – something I hope I have succeeded in creating. Lisa Hannigan’s deep, subtle, powerful voice, extraordinary lyrics, and exquisite instrumentation never fails to take me back and make me breathless. I owe so much to her music, and I carry it with me always – my ultimate idol.

A skill I always aspire to is Karine Polwart’s way of approaching painful and difficult topics, with such stunningly beautiful words and arrangements and the way Rachel Sermanni unflinchingly sings of the darkest thoughts inside her head, with such magnetic charm, always has me wishing I could do the same.

The moment I heard Ida Wenoe’s music, it became an irreversible part of my musical experience. It is like nothing else I’ve ever heard, and I never want to stop listening. Sandy Denny, John Smith, Joni Mitchell, Mick Flannery, Ben Howard, Kate Bush, Paolo Nutini, John Martyn, Bellowhead, Mawkin, Ange Hardy, James Vincent McMorrow, Iron and Wine, and many many others also deserve honourable mentions for their huge influence on my musicality.

Massive thanks to them all. We’re so lucky to live in a world so full of fantastic music!

Artist’s website: https://tillymoses.bandcamp.com/

‘Keeper Of The Keys’ live:

Tilly Moses is crowdfunding her debut album

Tilly Moses

At just 18 Tilly’s lyric writing and delicate instrumentation on mandolin and harmonium demonstrate a maturity beyond her years. She’s already featured on BBC Radio 1, BBC Radio 6 Music & BBC Introducing, and in 2014 she launched her 6 track EP Painted Faces which was produced by Ben Walker, a BBC Radio 2 Folk Award winner. In 2017 she is recording her debut album with contributions from a number of award winning folk musicians including Sam Kelly and James Delarre.

In 2016 despite being busy with A level studies she fitted in three tour dates with the Radio 2 Folk Award nominees Mawkin and opened for one of her great song writing influences, Irish musician Mick Flannery. Over the past few years she has supported some big names in the folk music world including Dave Swarbrick, Ashley Hutchings & Ken Nicol, Kathryn Roberts & Sean Lakeman, The Unthanks and Gilmore & Roberts. She was the youngest artist chosen by the EFDSS for a workshop of young folk singer-songwriters which included rising stars such as Maz O’Connor, Sam Kelly, Fabian Holland, Ange Hardy & the Carrivick sisters.

“I’m delighted to be recording my debut album with GingerDog Records, due for release in summer 2017. I’ll be joined by some exceptionally talented musicians – BBC Folk Award Winner Sam Kelly, BBC Jazz Award Winner Kit Downes, and James Delarre, the fiddle player from the BBC Folk Award nominated band Mawkin.”

Tilly grew up just outside Bury St Edmunds and is now at the University of York. She has been writing and performing music since she was 13. She has launched a crowd-funding campaign to raise money to produce the album. Please support her by going to: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/tilly-moses-debut-album

Alternatively donations can be sent by cheque made out to GingerDog Records and sent to GingerDog Records, Buxhall, Stowmarket IP14 3DJ

“In return for your help, I’ve taken time to come up with some great rewards – from things as small as a postcard written from me to you, to things as big as myself and some fellow musicians coming to your house to serenade your friends and family. Your money would go towards the recording costs, designing the album artwork, mastering and printing the album, and towards the costs of promotion. A donation of just a few pounds is welcome, as well as larger contributions.”

Artist’s website: http://www.tillymoses.com/

‘Harbour’ – live and very cold:

KARA – Some Other Shore (Self-Released)

Some Other ShoreFronted by the Russian-born (but quintessentially English-sounding) Daria Kulesh who also plays guitar and bodhran, alongside Kate Rouse on hammered dulcimer, guitarist Ben Honey and latest recruit Phil Underwood on melodeon, the Hertfordshire quartet’s latest fusion of traditional English and Russian folk also features one-off contributions from fiddle player James Delarre and Lukas Drinkwater on double bass with producer Jason Emberton providing any undefined extra bibs and bobs.

For those unfamiliar with the band, such as myself, the first thing that strikes is the crystalline purity of Kulesh’s often soaring vocals, clearly a voice born to sing traditional folk, to be followed by the heady marriage of diverse cultural stylings, characterised by the musical interplay between Rouse and Underwood. This time round, the majority of the songs and tunes are self-penned, opening with the five minute, fiddle-featured ‘Tamara’s Wedding’, Kulesh’s lyric about a woman seduced to hell by a duplicitously consoling demon after the death of the bridegroom inspired by ‘The Demon’, a poem by Mikhail Lermontov, itself drawing upon Georgian folk legend. Next up is the first of Honey’s five contributions, the far more English folk influences of ‘Seaview’ which, in talking about how certain places hold collective memories, may well be about the Edwardian resort on the Isle of Wight.

A similar wistful and whimsical quality informs his second song, ‘Adrienne’, which the notes describe as being about a song fairy, but is essentially about those magical singers who sometimes pop up at folk clubs, dazzle everyone, and are then gone. On a somewhat darker note, the melodeon-led, Drinkwater-featuring ‘Carousel Waltz’ addresses the cycle of addiction with slang references to cocaine and heroin before giving way to the frisky urgency of ‘Stormteller’ with its “pitter-patter” chorus which is all about those dark rain clouds that sometimes seem to hover over only you, although here Honey seems to suggest that such folk warrant having the soul sodden. His final number, ‘Devilry Dance’, is a clarinet-coloured jazzy folk swirl tale of Faustian pacts and metaphorical femme fatales that lead you on, promising to lift you on high only to see you fall.

Underwood makes his mark with two tracks, ‘Leigh Fishermen’, a traditional-flavoured tribute to those who risk their lives trawling the seas on which he harmonises behind Kulesh on the chorus, and the two sprightly- and, as you would expect, melodeon-led – English folk tunes ‘Hollingbourne/Broadhurst Gardens’, the titles referencing the village in Kent and his London suburb home.

Not to be left out, Rouse (who also appears on Ange Hardy’s Esteesee album) is featured, provides harmonies and arranged the six-and-a-half minute ‘Lovers’ Tasks/Black Tea Waltz’ which pairs a gently waltzing Appalachian version of ‘Scarborough Fair’ with her self-penned coda.

Of the three remaining tracks, Kulesh is wholly responsible for the haunting ‘Goodbye and Forgive Me’, its spooked musical box intro introducing a dark murder ballad, inspired by “Lady Macbeth of the Mtensk District”, about a woman trapped in an imprisoning marriage who conspires with her lover to have the husband killed, only for the crime to be exposed and her lover to take up with another woman, the end echoing the novel’s finale where both women drown.

Things are no cheerier on the dulcimer-based ‘Misery and Vodka’, her translation of a lugubrious Russian drinking song, sung in both English and the original, set to a Russian Gypsy tune (known as ‘Two Guitars’) by Ivan Vasiliev, though not the ballet dancer of the same name. The final track is also a traditional Russian tune and lyric, again translated by Kulesh, the title, ‘Ataman’, being the name given to Cossack military leaders, Rouse’s dulcimer solo precluding a mournful Russian and English sung story of a group of soldiers contemplating their fate (“rain will fall upon my bones…crows will feast upon my eyes”) in the coming battle. Not, perhaps, something to send you off into the evening full of the joys of life, but a terrific conclusion to a fine album but a band that deserve much wider recognition.

Mike Davies

If you would like to download a copy of the album or just listen to snippets of selected tracks then click on the banner link below to be taken to our associated partner Amazon’s website. Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

Artists’ website: www.karafolkband.com

The Kara showreel video (with Gary Holbrook on accordion):

KARA live at The Convent

Kara live

The Convent used to be just that. It was bought in a semi-derelict condition a few years ago and is now a hotel, spa, studio and music venue – still a work in progress and delightfully eccentric. The owners have kept the ecclesiastical fixtures and the décor is now a blend of religion and rock’n’roll. Its only drawback is that it is high on a hill accessed via impossibly narrow lanes which were fine when the Poor Clares were in residence but are hardly suited to 21st century traffic.

The theatre itself is the first floor chapel and it was here that Kara chose to launch their second album, Some Other Shore on June 3rd. Because all the Convent’s gigs are streamed live there are no intervals and Daria Kulesh’s decision to be her own support put her under some pressure. She was worried about her voice and, accompanied by Jonny Dyer on guitar and keyboards she began with less upbeat songs from her first solo album, Eternal Child before she hit her stride with ‘At Midnight’. The final two songs are scheduled for her second album. ‘The Moon And The Pilot’ has already been heard and ‘Amanat’ will be heard many times. Both are rooted in 19th and 20th century history and politics which are major preoccupations for Daria at the moment. I won’t even try to explain to intricacies of the songs but the album they are destined for will be a major work.

The band joined Daria on stage to begin their set with ‘Rusalka’ from their debut album before starting on the new one with ‘Tamara’s Wedding’ and James Delarre in a guest role on fiddle. I was very impressed with the new material and the excellent sound balance. No one instrument dominated – except Daria’s voice, of course, and sometimes she was at her most theatrical. This was only the third gig for new box-player Phil Underwood and he has fitted in well: just two CDs and a few other songs to learn in less than six months so no pressure. His predecessor, Gary Holbrook, came from the Irish tradition but Phil is very English as his set of tunes, ‘Hollingbourne/Broadhurst Gardens’ proved. That said, he’s an expert in Cajun and Creole music which could make for an interesting fusion in time to come.

Inevitably, it is Daria that dominates on stage, but the writing is democratic. Even so, Ben Honey has been affected by her mystique. ‘Adrienne’ is a song set in England but which belongs in Kara-land, as does ‘Carousel Waltz’ but Ben pins the blame for ‘Stormteller’ on Douglas Adams. There was one Russian song, ‘Misery And Vodka’, which began with a stunning hammered dulcimer solo from Kate Rouse who also wrote ‘Black Tea Waltz’.  They admitted that their encore ‘Start Wearing Purple’ was un-rehearsed and even un-arranged but it was fun. And then it was down to the bar!

Dai Jeffries

If you would like to download a copy of the album or just listen to snippets of selected tracks then click on the banner link below to be taken to our associated partner Amazon’s website. Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

Artists’ website: www.karafolkband.com

Some Other Shore showreel:

Mawkin return with new album release and tour

Folk rebels Mawkin will be embarking on a 12 date tour over the next month that will showcase their brand new album release The Ties That Bind.

Mawkin 2

Throughout this album launch tour expect to hear rousing songs of rebellion from David Delarre (Eliza Carthy, Tred) underpinned by the frenetic fiddling fingers of James Delarre (Saul Rose & James Delarre, Topette) and virtuosic bellowing of Nick Cooke’s melodeon (Kate Rusby, Jim Moray) held together by a solid rhythm section with Danny Crump on Bass and Lee Richardson on Drums. There is an exclusive limited edition vinyl release of the album, limited to just 300 copies on a first come first served basis, pre-orders are open now.

Since their formation in 2002 three-times-BBC-Folk-Award nominees Mawkin have grown into one of brit-folks brightest new guns: a blistering 5-piece band fusing folk, blues and rock, they are no strangers to the cutting edge of the contemporary music scene while still retaining all the verve and mystique of ancient folk music traditions from across the globe.

**** “Invigorating, highly inventive” Q Magazine

Artists’ website: http://www.mawkin.co.uk/

‘Jolly Well Drunk’ – the official video: