EFDSS announce marathon autumn program at Cecil Sharp House

EFDSS

Mike McGoldrick, John McCusker and John Doyle
Thursday 21 September, 7.30pm
£18 | £10 under 26s

John Doyle, John McCusker and Mike McGoldrick first crossed paths as teenagers. A quarter of a century later, the fired-up folk live-wires are set to celebrate their musical kinship, with their first studio album, The Wishing Tree. A thrilling trip through traditional, contemporary and original jigs, reels, ballads and more, it sees them branch out musically, while tracing the roots of their tunes, and of their friendship.

Trad Night – Jim Causley
Wednesday 27 September, £10

Traditional song – entertaining, rewarding, and often overlooked as an essential part of our history and culture. EFDSS is delighted to announce a new programme of concerts featuring the songs that have been loved, sung and shared for generations. Tales of love and lust, incest and murder, humour and tragedy, sung by talented contemporary performers of the tradition.

Trad Nights will take place in our most compact performance venue, Storrow, creating a truly intimate environment for the audience of no more than fifty fans of traditional, unamplified folk music.

Jim Causley celebrates over a decade as an acclaimed solo artist and performer with his latest studio album Forgotten Kingdom, his first album of entirely self-penned material. A broad collection of songs inspired by his native West Country, Jim mixes ancient history with his own personal history and experience of the world.

Since the release of his debut album in 2005, Causley’s unique voice and persona have helped him become one of the most well-loved and respected figures of today’s contemporary roots and folk music scene.

Martin and Eliza Carthy with support from The Drystones

Saturday 30 September, 7.30pm
£20 | £10 under 26s

The good Doctor Martin Carthy and his twice Mercury nominated daughter Eliza Carthy, join forces to perform songs from their first duo album ever, a CD of traditional material entitled The Elephant, which was released in May 2014 on Topic Records.

The Drystones are two twenty-one year olds from Somerset playing a lively mix of their own interpretations of traditional folk tunes and original compositions. Very accomplished on violin, guitar and whistle, they were Steve Lamacq’s “recommendation of the day” at Glastonbury Festival 2013. For just two people they make a lot of sound!

Kings of the South Seas
Wednesday 4 October, 7.30pm
£14 | £10 under 26s

In 1845, Captain Sir John Franklin departed on his ill-fated voyage in search of the North-West Passage. Within just the last few years, his HMS Erebus and Terror have been discovered at the bottom of the icy seas off Northern Canada. With the ‘Franklin’ album, Kings of The South Seas will bring to life the traditional and written music left by these events and their cultural fallout; from Canadian Voyageur paddling songs, English folk ballads and songs composed on-board ice-bound wintering ships to Victorian parlour pieces.

Tunes of the Munster Pipers

Thursday 5 October, 7.30pm

This performance tells the story of Canon James Goodman and the journey of this collection to the 21st century. Combining spoken word, curated imagery, and live musical performance, come and learn of the life and times of Canon Goodman, and the musical landscape of 19th century southwest Ireland.

Germa Adan
Wednesday 11 October, 7.30pm
£12 | £10 under 26s

Germa Adan writes and performs music that draws inspiration from Haitian, American & British folk music. She was recently awarded EFDSS Creative Seed Funding to write and arrange songs that explore narratives of the diasporic life.

Young Waters
Wednesday 18 October, 7.30pm
£12 | £10 under 26s

Young Waters’ twisted neo-folk is a tapestry of emotionally powerful vocals, stirring harmonies, lyrical violin solos and finely mastered acoustic guitar. Their combination of startling original material and traditional folk songs makes for a captivating stage presence.

Happy Traum: Coming of Age in the Greenwich Village Folk Revival and the Woodstock Scene (1954 – 1971)

Thursday 19 October, 7.30pm
£16 | £10 under 26s

With colourful anecdotes and incisive memories, and the aid of vintage photos and music clips, Happy Traum relates some of his adventures as an active member of the New York folk revival, and his friendships with some of the leading folk artists of the day, including Bob Dylan and Brownie McGhee. Happy punctuates his remembrances with powerful renditions of songs and guitar solos from the “folk era” and beyond.

Trad Night – Laura Smyth & Ted Kemp
Wednesday 25 October, 7.30pm, £10

Laura and Ted take a no-nonsense approach to traditional English folk song, taking their cues from revival singers such as Frankie Armstrong, Peter Bellamy and the Watersons. With repertoire drawn from their homes in the North West and East Anglia, expect strong vocals, tight harmonies and unfussy arrangements of songs sung with passion.

Pagoda Project
Wednesday 1 November, 7.30pm
£14 | £10 under 26s

Paul Hutchinson, also known for Belshazzar’s Feast, and Karen Wimhurst, previously a member of the Cauld Blast Orchestra, have a wealth of musical experience in a diverse range of genres from classical to folk.

Tales & Tunes: Kathryn Tickell & David Almond with Amy Thatcher

Thursday 2 November, 7.30pm
£18 | £10 under 26s

These artists’ work grows from the landscape, language, history and strange beauty of the north. With the drive of David’s storytelling and Kathryn’s love of the traditions of her native Northumbria, the poetic power of language and music combine.

On stage Kathryn and David are joined by accordionist and clog dancer Amy Thatcher to bring you a memorable evening of stories, songs and, of course, irrepressible music. If you enjoyed Kathryn’s “Northumbrian Voices” this is an unmissable show for you!

Tilston and Lowe
Wednesday 8 November, 7.30pm
£14 | £10 under 26s

Steve Tilston and Jez Lowe, two of the UK acoustic/folk scene’s finest songwriters join forces for a concert filled with songs and music, chat and banter and intimate insights into their approach to their craft. Listen in as they rekindle the spontaneity of their late-night living-room song swaps.

 

An Evening with the Seeger MacColl Family
Thursday 16 November, 7.30pm
£18 | £10 under 26s

The Seeger MacColl family are one of folk music’s most loved dynasties. Singer, songwriter and feminist icon Peggy Seeger performs with Neill and Calum, her sons with Ewan MacColl.

Peggy long-awaited memoir, ‘First Time Ever’ will be published in October. To celebrate, Peggy, Neill and Calum will be touring a special related show in which she’ll mix extracts from the book with the songs that have meant the most to her over the years. Expect anecdotes from her long and remarkable career together with performances songs new and old.

The Stray Birds
Saturday 18 November, 7.30pm
£15 | £10 under 26s

The Stray Birds started as a duo of acoustic buskers when Maya de Vitry and Oliver Craven met with their instruments, their voices, and their songs. It didn’t take much convincing to get bassist Charlie Muench on board, and with the addition of a third unique and powerful voice, the group began to define its captivating sound. Since taking America by storm in 2013 they have gone on to win a huge fan base following appearances at big festivals around the world.

Trad Night – Thomas McCarthy
Wednesday 22 November, 7.30pm, £10

Thomas McCarthy is a man steeped in the tradition of Irish song, intoxicated by the music and passionate in his sensitivity towards them. He comes from a considerable dynasty of traditional singers, song-makers and musicians, and grew up surrounded by the singing of his late mother, her father and aunts and uncles. Having spent his life learning the songs of his family, in 2008 Thomas sang publicly for the first time at the folk club at Cecil Sharp House. By the following year, he had sung at the most prominent folk festivals and clubs in Ireland and England and had appeared on BBC radio.

Sam Kelly and the Lost Boys
Wednesday 29 November, 7.30pm
£14 | £10 under 26s

Sam is one of the most exciting young prospects in the folk scene, having gained a reputation for an incredibly high class and dynamic live show.

Coming from a family largely made up of Norfolk dairy farmers has left Sam with an unmatched experience of singing in front of hurtfully disinterested Friesians, and his meandering musical journey has ranged from reaching the final of ITV’s Britain’s Got Talent as a teenager, to being selected for the first ever EFDSS Artist Development Scheme. Whether playing to 13 million people on prime-time television, or to 10 people in a tiny pub, Sam’s child-like fascination with music shines through.

Jess Morgan & Kitty Macfarlane
Wednesday 6 December, 7.30pm
£12 | £10 under 26s

Jess Morgan is a songwriter’s songwriter. Her performance is a tumbler of unfancied folk-roots music, with heart, passion and gusto.

Kitty Macfarlane’s songs are charged with a sense of place – more often than not her home county of Somerset – and her lyrics combine honest snapshots of everyday humanity with much bigger questions.

India Electric Co
Wednesday 13 December, 7.30pm
£12 | £10 under 26s

Sometimes folk, sometimes not. India Electric Company use traditional instruments in contemporary styles to explore diverse themes from Eastern Europe, Irish traditions and urban alienation to end up with something “quirky and glittery – a veritable musical magpie’s nest” (Mary Ann Kennedy, BBC Radio 3).

Belshazzar’s Feast

Thursday 14 December, 7.30pm
£15 | £10 youth

On tour with a Christmas-themed show that mixes traditional folk music, seasonal material, added to their usual touch of classical and jazz, with a bit of pop and music hall, all topped off with lashings of wry humour.  Paul Sartin (of Bellowhead and Faustus) and Paul Hutchinson (of Hoover The Dog) together wow audiences across the UK with their eclectic and eccentric mix of tunes and between songs chat that always sends audiences home with smiles on their faces.

Festive Gathering
Sunday 17 December, 7.30pm
£15 | £10 under 26s

Join for us our ever-popular, annual celebration of yuletide, with a chance to join in on the songs and merriment.

Cecil Sharp House Choir, led by Sally Davies, will perform joyful a cappella arrangements of traditional, seasonal songs, carols and wassails from the British Isles and beyond, sung in glorious harmony.  Folk dancers, singers and musicians will fill Kennedy Hall – the main space at Cecil Sharp House – with seasonal cheer.

For bookings go to: cecilsharphouse.org/csh-whats-on

MONSTER CEILIDH BAND – Mutation (Haystack Records HAYCD011)

MutationThere was a time when I would stand in front of a ceilidh band and when things were going well and you had a hall full of people who were into it it was the most fun you could have with your clothes on. When it comes to recording an album a ceilidh band has two choices: play the music four-square for dancing and teaching or spice it up a bit. The first option must be deadly for the band so, with Mutation, Monster Ceilidh Band have opted for the latter, recording this set live off the floor at Castle Sound under the watchful eye of Stuart Hamilton.

The band can boast four writers who are responsible for 80% of the record. There’s Amy Thatcher, purveyor of accordion to The Shee and Kathryn Tickell, fiddlers Shona Mooney (The Shee) and Grace Smith (The Rachel Hamer Band) and multi-instrumentalist Kieran Szifris, who restricts himself to octave mandolin on this album. Add a couple of traditional tunes and a borrow from Adam Sutherland and there you have it. Monster Ceilidh Band don’t go in for monster medleys only pairing tunes.

The opening set, ‘Venus’, is one such pairing, mating ‘Proximo B’ by Shona with ‘Venus’ by Amy. The others are ‘Mutated Beeswing’ pairing the essentially fiddle solo of ‘The Beeswing Hornpipe’ with Shona’s title track. It’s not clear who the soloist given but as Amy joins in after a couple of minutes I’m guessing it’s Shona. ‘Mutation’ is mutated by Joseph Truswell’s electronics which are a feature of the album. Here, there is something that could be accordion but could equally be distorted wordless vocals.

The band move seamless from that to the relatively conventional ‘All The Swingle Ladies’ by Keiran, half of which you could dance to if you could keep up the pace. Great titles include ‘Trouser Worrier’, ‘Octopus’ and ‘Disgrace’, the latter coming from the quill of Grace Smith as if you had to ask. Even past the record’s half-way mark we hear something new as ‘Never Will’ is introduced by snarling, distorted…what? Bass, I suppose as David de la Haye takes a brief solo.

No, you’re not going to dance (in any formal sense) to ‘Mutation’, although Joseph’s drums are rock solid throughout, but you will enjoy some musical invention.

Dai Jeffries

If you would like to order a copy of the one of the albums (in CD or Vinyl), download them or just listen to snippets of selected tracks (track previews are usually on the download page) then click on the MONSTER CEILIDH BAND – Mutation link to be taken to our associated partner Amazon’s website. Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

DOWNLOAD – [CD]

Artists’ website: http://monsterceilidhband.co.uk/

‘Disgrace’:

THE SHEE – Continuum (Shee Records SHEE4)

ContinuumThe concept behind Continuum, supported by Celtic Connections, was to celebrate their tenth anniversary by having each of them commission a musician of their choice to write a piece of music for the album. That’s only half the story, of course, for the band had then to arrange the music for six players and write some pieces to bind the whole thing together.

The opening song is ‘From The Shadows’ by Laura-Beth Salter. It’s a powerful call to arms to … ah, well. It could be a feminist piece, the logical first thought, but it could be a warning to the rich and powerful that the poor and oppressed aren’t going to take it any more. Next come two atmospheric pieces by Kathryn Tickell; one evoking the borders and the other with a Scandinavian feel. The playing, needless to say, is exquisite.

Rachel Newton commissioned Karine Polwart and the result is ‘Song For Mary’. The Mary in question is Mary Brooksbank, composer of ‘The Jute Mill Song’ and an archive recording of one verse forms the introduction. We’re not told that it’s Mary herself but I’d like to think it is. Amy Thatcher naturally turned to a box-player and who better than Andy Cutting? Olivia Ross’ choice was Chris Wood who shares the credit for ‘Cradle Song’ with lyricist Hugh Lupton. The Shee turns what could be a pretty little song into something quite strange so you’re not sure whether this a mother singing to her baby from the safety of a warm fireside or struggling home from the storm outside.

Laura-Beth, Amy and Shona Mooney provide the next two tune sets with Shona responsible for the wonderfully titled ‘The Vampire Rabbit Of Newcastle’. Olivia wrote ‘Precious Tears’, a song for children – possibly the band members’ own – and Brian Finnegan wrote a trio of tunes with Lillias- Kinsman-Blake’s flute and a journey through India in mind. Finally, we have Martin Simpson’s song for his mother. ‘Dance With Me’ might be seen as the companion-piece to ‘Never Any Good’. Laura-Beth sings it and plays mandolin where Martin would use guitar and the band play what is almost an orchestral accompaniment.

Continuum is a monument to musical collaboration and the exchange of ideas but more than that, it is a tribute to six exceptionally talented musicians.

Dai Jeffries

If you would like to order a copy of the one of the albums (in CD or Vinyl), download them or just listen to snippets of selected tracks (track previews are usually on the download page) then click on the THE SHEE – Continuum link to be taken to our associated partner Amazon’s website. Buying through Amazon on folking.com helps us to recover a small part of our running costs, so please order anything you need as every little purchase helps us.

Artists’ website: https://theshee.com/

‘Ower Late For The Lasses/Sheepolska’ and more with Kathryn Tickell live at Celtic Connections 2016:

KATHRYN TICKELL & THE SIDE: new album

KTandSide‘Kathryn Tickell & The Side’
Release Date: 29th September 2014
Label: Resilient Records RES006 (Proper Distribution)

Kathryn Tickell & The Side features Kathryn Tickell on Northumbrian pipes, fiddle and voice; Louisa Tuck (Royal Northern Sinfonia) cello; Amy Thatcher, accordion and voice and Ruth Wall, harps (lever, bray, wire-strung) and voice.

When world-renowned Northumbrian piping virtuoso Kathryn Tickell decided to put a new band together, she wasn’t going to let a mere 600 mile round trip for rehearsals stand in her way (Ruth, the harpist, lives in Cornwall, the rest of the band are in Northumberland) nor was she daunted by the fact that cellist Louisa already had a full-time job with Royal Northern Sinfonia. “These are the musicians I wanted to work with” she says “and the best things in life are not always the easiest!” Eighteen months later, that determination and focus has paid dividends with the release of the ensemble’s eponymous debut album Kathryn Tickell & The Side which will be released on 29th September, followed by a UK tour in October / November.
Continue reading KATHRYN TICKELL & THE SIDE: new album

KATHRYN TICKELL – Northumbrian Voices (Park Records PRKCD121)

KATHRYN TICKELL Northumbrian VoicesThere can be nobody prouder than a father and raconteur (Mike Tickell) witnessing his daughter entertaining an audience from centre stage and in this case the daughter (Kathryn Tickell) vice-versa. That much is obvious from the camaraderie of everyone involved on this wonderfully crafted 2-disk set from those very fine chaps at Park Records. Now, where do you place a recording that would comfortably settle on either an audio book or music CD shelf? Well, for me it sits alongside my previous recordings of her albums of which I profess to own most of them. Although internationally recognised for her Continue reading KATHRYN TICKELL – Northumbrian Voices (Park Records PRKCD121)